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flexible-foam/polyresin appliques
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  #1  
01-10-2009, 07:32 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Alabama
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flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

I hope I''ve been trying to find the compound used to make furniture appliques/onlays that are bendable and stainable. I thought it might consist of plastic resin glue, water and sawdust, but I can find nothing to that effect -- many years ago my uncle told me you could mix glue and sawdust to make a wood filler.

Because castings are so expensive, I thought of making a mold and then casting my own pieces. I need pieces to use for wall/ceiling mouldings and also furniture -- the wall and ceiling pieces will be painted but the furniture pieces will be stained.

Also, does anyone know how long it will take to cure pieces -- days or hours??

thanks a bunch,
  #2  
01-10-2009, 07:54 PM
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Location: Port Aransas tx
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

wood glue and sawdust works well as filler.
it sands to a hard finish if you get the mix right.
it will dry over night if its not to thick.
epoxy and sawdust is a better choice for larger areas.

i dont know how flexible these kinds of glues are.
it will not stain well either.
  #3  
01-10-2009, 08:16 PM
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

Old House Journal used to detail all that stuff. Their book for sure gives the rundown on how to make the plaster ornaments for the walls/ceiling. The wood composition stuff I seem to recall someone telling me they steamed it before applying to furniture, to get the bends,etc.
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  #4  
01-11-2009, 01:39 PM
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

thanks for your response.

I should have posted a picture and description of what I''s polyresin, a composite material of plastic and fiberglass. Suitable for use indoors or outside, this material can be sawed, nailed, or screwed and painted or stained.

Dozens of designs from simple to ornate are available. Thinner pieces, like the one shown, will flex enough so that they can be installed on a slightly curved wall.

I found a recipe for SAWDUST CLAY ...

2 cups sawdust
1 cup wallpaper paste
water

Mix the dry wallpaper paste with the sawdust. Add water slowly until you have a thick mixture. Make shapes and let dry overnight. You can sand the finished products and paint or stain them.


I don''t know if anyone else would be interested in this or not, but, in my search, I found this


Composite Plastic Lumber

Recycled wood/ composite plastic lumber is made from a 50/50 mix of plastic resins and reclaimed wood such as sawdust from manufacturing plants that would otherwise be discarded.

...Plastic lumber expands and contracts more than wood and is heavier than dry wood of the same size.


now I''ll let you know.

thanks for taking the time to help me with this, I really appreciate it
  #8  
01-12-2009, 08:44 AM
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

Yes, you can cast it in anything. The red paint and gels stain is just a faux finish-- wood graining. The gel stain will work, as would painters'' glaze with pigment added. The goal at that point is to make the mix more transparent so the color underneath shows through a bit.
Depending on what type of wood you intend to mimic, the base color will change.

do you mean I could cast in anything and use a regular stain, or cast in anything and use a basecoat and gel-stain? The last time I stained furniture I took a table leg to Home Depot and they matched the stain - a black stain with red pigments. At this point I don''m not sure whether the pigment color will be red or brown - I''t matter what you cast it in, because you are essentially sealing the stuff. Whether you just match the applique to the chair or paint the whole chair depends on your skills and patience.
if it were me, I''d go ahead and fasten the applique to the chair (glue/nail/etc.) before any finishing work is done.
After it is dry, come back and fill any gaps/nailholes that might be left around the edges (plastic wood or elmer''natural''natural''wash''wash''s homepage! Find all posts by dondougan
  #12  
01-16-2009, 06:45 PM
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

Quote:
Originally Posted by dondougan
Maimi,

I pretty much agree with Grommet, but I''s latex wood filler) and smooth, let dry.
Sand the roughness away, and apply your base-coat color which will be the faux '' wood tone (this usually works best if it is a flat or matte paint).
Then come back with your gel-stain or faux-graining glaze. There are rubber combs and graining brushes made for this purpose at hobby shops and craft stores -- not sure if the big box places like Home Depot will carry them. You can also make your own disposable ones out of cardboard and old somewhat-stiffened paint brushes, soft plastic hair-combs, stiff goose feathers, etc. The trick is to keep playing with it until it looks '' at a distance of six feet or so away. Sometimes a third coat of slightly darker/lighter color than the 2nd coat (applied after 2nd coat is dry) allows for a more natural appearance.
After all that is dry (24 hours) then apply your top sealing coat -- I favor semi-gloss or matte sealers, but use gloss for a more durable finish.
Optionally, an additional step would be to apply a '' to tone down and unify the overall finish.
After the top sealing coat is dry a thinned-down (50/50) acrylic flat wall paint in brownish/grayish tones can be brushed over the whole and the wiped off with a damp rag while it is still wet. This '' will leave some traces of color in the grooves and designs, giving it a few-times-round-the-block feel as opposed to right-off-the-shelf.

You are on your way to a career in faux finishing . . . <grin>

Cheers,
Don

www.dondougan.com

hopefully I will get the opportunity to try all this out. I was thinking about the '' this morining ... I was wondering if the base color could be applied as a glaze coat and also whether a gel-stain can be tinted as a regular stain.
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  #13  
01-16-2009, 07:38 PM
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Location: Marietta (Atlanta) Georgia
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

Mamie,

Yes to both. I usually mix my own from scratch using paints and colorants I have hanging around. Make sure you use compatible materials if you start mixing. Most colorants are made to work with both alkyd (oil) and latex (water) base paints. There are liquid colorants (alcohol base that works with either alkyd or latex) and dry pigments — the dry ones are what I usually use, though they require much more mixing time than the liquid ones. Be aware that too much colorant added can drastically slow drying times and reduce bonding power of the coat of paint, though slight changes will probably not affect it noticeably.

Basic rule of thumb is that alkyd can be applied over latex but usually not the other way around. Latex dries faster both to touch (minutes to hours), and completely within several hours, while alkyd might dry to touch in hours but a complete dry is actually days or weeks at comfortable room temperature/humidity. This means anything put on top of alkyd needs to allow for the slower drying. Crackled and crazed faux finishes rely on these properties to create patterns, but those patterns are not always desired.

Cheers,
Don

www.dondougan.com
dondougan
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Visit dondougan''t recommend doing the basecoat in flat, it will absorb too much of the glaze or stain from the next layer/ will be unforgiving. You want a little bit of "slip". In general, as long as the patterns you leave are vaguely wood-like, the more subtle variation in your colors per layer, the more realistic it looks. What this means is that when I do a basecoat of opaque paint, I use a "dirty brush", dipping into two colors (or more) at once. Study the wood you''ll all come out in the wash.
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  #16  
01-17-2009, 01:11 PM
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Re: flexible-foam/polyresin appliques

Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet
I don''re hoping to mimic first.

Ditto on the pigment caution when doing your own tinting. There is no "binder" in the colorants/tints, if you put way too much in, you might as well be painting with mashed potatoes; it''s Online


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